Posts tagged with: food cupboard

Setting Up Your Child’s Food Cupboard/Drawer/Shelf

There are many items that you can put into the cupboards and drawers that I mentioned before, depending on the age of the child.

Young Children (Snacks and breakfasts):

  • Cereal can be divided into plastic baggies/containers with lids.
  • Crackers and peanut butter can also be divided up into servings.
  • So can trail mix.
  • Granola bars can be put the drawer as well.
  • Fresh fruits can go into a bowl in a deep drawer.
  • In the refrigerator, keep yogurts on hand, as well as servings of cut up vegetables. You will also want to pour juice and or milk into pourable containers that are easy for them to handle.
  • Be sure to have bowls, spoons and cups in the drawer as well.

Older Children (After school snacks):

  • On their shelf in the refrigerator they should have milk, juice and other cold beverages, yogurts, string cheese, jelly, and cut up vegetables and dressing.
  • For cooking in the microwave, consider canned pastas, canned soups and Easy Mac.
  • You should also provide homemade muffins, crackers, peanut butter, bread, trail mix and granola bars.

For Teens (Able to us microwave, stove and oven):

  • For microwave cooking: Popcorn, Easy Mac, canned pasta.
  • For stove top: Pasta and sauce, rice and canned veggies.
  • For oven use: Muffin and other snack mixes, cooking oil
  • In the refrigerator: Drinks, yogurt, sandwich fixings, cut up veggies, eggs for baking.
  • Sandwich fixings, chips, granola bars, trail mix, fresh fruits.

You can see the progression here. As children get older, they earn the privileges of using appliances, and they can handle food preparation more easily.

Shannon

PS: If you have any ideas for the food cupboards, shelves and drawers, please share them by leaving a comment.

Other Articles of Interest:

A Food Cupboard in Your Kitchen Helps Older Children be Independent

Rewarding Good Behaviour


A Food Cupboard in Your Kitchen Helps Older Children be Independent

Older children need to be able to feel more independent, and teenagers can eat you out of house and home. Both groups will do well to have some freedom as to what after school snacks they can have, or what meals if they are home alone.

Giving them a food cupboard of their won is a good way to handle both of these situations. They can learn responsibility, and this frees you up to worry about other things. It will also save you some money, because you will have more control over how much your child is eating.

Now, how to create the cupboard:

  • Step 1: Choose an appropriate cupboard, one which your child can easily reach all the way into the back of.
  • Step 2: Decide what types of food items you will put into the cupboard. Will there be items that need to be cooked? This will depend on the age of the child. You may allow them to only use the microwave when they are gone. Teenagers may have full access to the stove and oven.
  • Step 3: Sit down with your child and get his or her input on what they would like in the cupboard.
  • Step 4: Set up a designated area in the refrigerator for items that need to go in there. Maybe a shelf on the door. Make sure your child knows that she/he is only to touch what is in her/his designated area.
  • Step 5: Clear and wash out the cupboard that will be known as your child’s cupboard from now on.
  • Step 6: Set a budget for the week and take your child shopping.
  • Step 7: Have your child put his/her groceries away. You will, at this time, want to prepare things like peanut butter and crackers. This way, there will be less mess on your child’s part.
  • Step 8: Go over the rules of the cupboard food system. Is this only for after school snacks? Meals and snacks? Go over the safety rules of the stove/oven and microwave.

You may find other things that you need to do to prepare.

 

Shannon

P.S. Share with us your experiences regarding children’s set-up in your home in the comments section. Thank you.

Other Articles of Interest:

Setting Up Your Child’s Food Cupboard/Shelf/Drawer

Rewarding Good Behaviour